Fiction · Magical Realism and Fantasy · Youth

When Sorrow Was Swallowed By Hope

The Girl Who Drank the Moon tells of a whole village, the Protectorate, living under a cloud of sorrow. Each year all of the village leaders, except one, insist that a new infant gets left in the woods as a sacrifice to a terrifying witch of legend. Antain, a leader-in-training in the Protectorate’s corrupt oligarchy, prefers the beauty of carpentry to the lust of power and is torn apart by these seemingly necessary sacrifices. While the people look outside the village for the evil they fear, Sister Ignatia remains a terror from within, imprisoning those who refuse the sacrifices under the guise of healing their madness.

This is a story about one infant rescued from her abandonment by the good witch Xan, enmagicked by drinking moonlight, and raised in the woods as Luna by her adopted family: Xan, the adorable Fyrian (a Perfectly Tiny dragon orphan who dreams of being Simply Enormous), and Glerk, the ancient bog monster, who quotes the poetry he sees in all the world. When hope motivates Antain towards the woods and the desire for truth motivates Luna towards the Protectorate, will they be able to unite in stopping the true evil before it is too late? A story with parallel plots, and many characters who come together in a surprising twist, this is a saga of light and darkness, sorrow and hope.

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Fiction · Magical Realism and Fantasy · Youth

The Psychology of Eve

The Lie Tree Author: Frances Hardinge Genre: Fantasy, Mystery, Historical Fiction Length: 410 pg. Published: Amulet Books, April 2016 Buy: Amazon The Biblical Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil offered a fruit that promised Eve insight into the secrets of God, and she took and ate. What answers did she crave that warranted… Continue reading The Psychology of Eve

Fiction · Magical Realism and Fantasy · Youth

Author Spotlight: Kate Dicamillo On the Nature of Love

When I need a reminder that, despite its sorrows, the world is aglow with hope and meaning, I read Kate DiCamillo. I discovered her writings as an adult, but I wish she had been part of my childhood; her stories linger, begging to be re-read, and I have the suspicion that their layers evolve with… Continue reading Author Spotlight: Kate Dicamillo On the Nature of Love